LabourNet's Gayathri Vasudevan on Guiding Underprivileged Youth Towards Entrepreneurship | woman at work

LabourNet’s Gayathri Vasudevan on Guiding Underprivileged Youth Towards Entrepreneurship

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After learning the tricks of the trade in vehicle servicing, two brothers collaborated to rent out a garage, earning about 2500 rupees a day. Making small savings on a regular basis, they hope to have a business of their own some day. Coming from a very poor family, barely making ends meet, today they are standing on their own feet. With the help of LabourNet’s skill development centre and the mentorship programme, they are well on their way to self-sufficiency.

Developing skills + giving employment

Gayathri Vasudevan, CEO of LabourNet Services Pvt.Ltd, (a social enterprise firm that aims to bring livelihoods to underprivileged people), is one of the pioneering leaders in bringing financial security to people by helping them venture out on their own. Through skill development and employment opportunities, countless people like the two brothers, Praveen and Naveen are benefitted.

With such opportunities available at LabourNet, young entrepreneurs are able to build businesses from the ground up. She says, “When we think of entrepreneurship, our mind seems to be more attuned to the urban landscape, conjuring up tech entrepreneurs with means and skill sets. It is about time that we turn our focus towards a section of the society that is going through a quiet and gradual revolution, displaying a positive zeal and focused drive to make a sustainable livelihood.”

Supporting 7000 Entrepreneurs

With a five-point strategic plan, LabourNet helps over 7000 up and coming entrepreneurs by intensively guiding them throughout the first eight months since they come from impoverished backgrounds. After which they train them in understanding all the technical aspects of running a business, like accounting, transactions, savings etc. One of the most important things they is striving to become a legally cetified business. Also, they learn how to create a strong link between capital and working capital and finally, customising the brand and product to the consumer, thereby increasing the value of the brand.

So, with lessons like these, it doesn’t matter where these budding entrepreneurs come from, the right training and guidance can promote a positive approach to entrepreneurship, especially for people from disadvantaged areas of our society.

Image credit: sites.ndtv.com

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Amanda Francis

Ever since she cast her eyes on comic books as a child, Amanda has wanted to become a writer. She has two degrees in English literature and loves to scour the internet to write about all the things that intrigue people.

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